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Necklace Friday
Turquoise, malachite and silver pendent, made by an artist in Wisconsin. One of my favorites, it reminds me of the Texas coast where the brown pelicans nearly went extinct from DDT, and now they have come back. Plus the poem my Dad use to recite as we were watching them.
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Comments on this photo:

Jan 20 2012 15:39 GMT Foggydew
lovely piece!
Jan 20 2012 15:52 GMT CeterusParibus
that's a beauty
Jan 20 2012 15:59 GMT superJoan
Nice pendant...
Jan 20 2012 16:37 GMT bandsix
This is a really lovely piece Jo....the poem would be nice to see, as well :)
Jan 20 2012 16:41 GMT hans55 PRO
a very nice necklace ... nice art !
Jan 20 2012 17:21 GMT RainyDay
beautiful!!!
Jan 20 2012 18:36 GMT senna3
Wonderful entry!
Jan 20 2012 19:14 GMT Lie
Love your neckless...and the pelican, a real piece off art.....
Jan 20 2012 19:53 GMT sini
Wonderful necklace entry!:)
Jan 20 2012 20:47 GMT Pea2007
Fantastic composition and entry.
Jan 20 2012 21:17 GMT jomoud PRO
Simple but wonderfully elegant.
Great entry for the theme.
Have a fabulous weekend
Jan 20 2012 23:17 GMT Milibuh
Beautiful choice...
Jan 20 2012 23:29 GMT fhelsing PRO
a special entry!
Jan 21 2012 01:59 GMT potterjo
Dixon Lanier Merritt (1879 – 1972) was a poet and humorist. He was a newspaper editor for the Tennessean, Nashville's morning paper, and President of the American Press Humorists Association. He penned this well-known limerick in 1910:[1]

A wonderful bird is the pelican,
His bill will hold more than his belican,
He can take in his beak
Enough food for a week
But I'm damned if I see how the helican!

or:

A funny old bird is a pelican.
His beak can hold more than his bellican.
Food for a week
He can hold in his beak,
But I don't know how the hellican.

The limerick, inspired by a post card sent to him by a female reader of his newspaper column who was visiting Florida beaches. It is often misattributed to Ogden Nash and is widely misquoted as demonstrated above. It is quoted in a number of scholarly works on ornithology, including "Manual of Ornithology: Avian Structure and Function," by Noble S. Proctor and Patrick J. Lynch, and several others.

Merritt served as Tennessee State Director of Public Safety, taught at Cumberland University and was editor of the "The Tennessean" and "Lebanon Democrat" newspapers and later contributed a column for many years called "Our Folks". During the 1920s he was the Southern correspondent for "Outlook" magazine, a weekly newsmagazine aimed at rural readers. He edited a comprehensive "History of Wilson County (Tennessee)" in his eighties. He worked for the U.S. federal government twice, around the time of both World Wars, and ultimately retired from the Rural Electrification Administration's telephone program office.

Merritt was a founding member of the Tennessee Ornithological Society. A nature center at the Tennessee Cedars of Lebanon State Park is named for him. He served as President of the Society of American Press Humorists. Following World War I he returned to the familial farm near Lebanon, TN and using portions of various cedar log cabins nearly one hundred years old assembled a new structure on a hill which he dubbed "Cabincroft". Croft being a Scottish word for a place of shelter. He maintained a working farm into his seventies preferring natural methods.

Born Dixon Lanier Abernathy, his parents divorced while he was a child and one of his five uncles subsequently adopted him. Upon achieving majority at age 21 Dixon legally changed his surname to Merritt, something he said he regreted later in life. Dixon Merritt was married twice, first to Harriotte Triplett Johnson of Kentucky ending in divorce with issue of a son and daughter (all deceased) and the second to Ruth Yates of New York with issue of two sons (still living as of January 2012).
Jan 21 2012 10:22 GMT wijnie58
Beautiful necklace entry.....!!
Jan 21 2012 15:06 GMT fashionmonster94
This is very neat :)
Jan 21 2012 18:15 GMT sider
Wowww... Lovely shot and great detail of history. ';))
Jan 21 2012 20:28 GMT pauli3522
this is so nice indeed
Jan 22 2012 03:20 GMT martini957
Wonderful necklace entry...love the poem too
Jan 22 2012 03:41 GMT linnywv PRO
Lovely!
Jan 22 2012 06:15 GMT maria123
Original piece!

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