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Photos 1 - 5 of 1592

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DOWN - DOWN UNDER THE WATERS
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Jan 01 2007 21:10 GMT handan
lots of tension athmosphere; well framed
Jan 27 2007 08:41 GMT Fankocska
Wow....it is interesting to see something like this.
Jan 27 2007 09:23 GMT Godlieb
It is easy to see, Frankocska, independly that it is a so old but traditional technology ...
Tjhank Yoiu Handan ...
Dec 25 2007 06:30 GMT Godlieb
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS . . .
Dec 25 2007 06:31 GMT Godlieb
CHRISTMAS GREETINGS . . .
Jan 10 2008 09:42 GMT OrangeRose
Wow I not seen one of these diving suits in years. I think the last time I had seen one was back in the 1960's sometime. :)
Jan 10 2008 10:08 GMT Godlieb
YES. BUT SOME TIMES THEY ARE IN USE - AND BETTER - IN HEAVY WRECKS . . .
May 01 2008 12:52 GMT GeoffReeves
Rhetoric is the art of harnessing reason, emotions and authority, through language, with a view to persuade an audience and, by persuading, to convince this audience to act, to pass judgment or to identify with given values. According to Plato, rhetoric is the “art of enchanting the soul.”

In Greece, rhetoric originated in a school of pre-Socratic philosophers known as Sophists c.600 BC. It was later taught, in the Roman Empire, and during the Middle Ages, as one of the three original liberal arts or trivium (along with logic and grammar).

In Ancient and Medieval eras of European history, rhetoric concerned itself with persuasion in public and political settings such as assemblies and courts of law. As such, rhetoric is said to flourish in open and democratic societies with rights of free speech, free assembly, and political enfranchisement for some portion of the population. However, celebratory (or epideictic) rhetoric, alongside deliberative rhetoric, is just as important an element of tyrannical regimes or dogmatic (religious and otherwise) public entities that are not open to debate on an equal footing.

In contraposition to scientific debates , rhetorical arguments, as in politics or even justice, do not make use of demonstrable or tested truths, but resort to fallible opinions, popular perceptions, transient beliefs, chosen evidence or evidence at hand (like statistics), which are all properly called commonplaces as they help establish a commonality of understanding between the orator or rhetor and his/her audience.

Contemporary studies of rhetoric have a more diverse range of practices and meanings than was the case in ancient times. The concept of rhetoric has thus shifted widely during its 3300-year history. Rhetoricians have recently argued that the classical understanding of rhetoric is limited because persuasion depends on communication, which in turn depends on meaning. Thus the scope of rhetoric is understood to include much more than simply public--legal and political--discourse. This emphasis on meaning and how it is constructed and conveyed draws on a large body of critical and social theory (see literary theory and Critical Theory), philosophy (see Post-structuralism and Hermeneutics), and problems in social science methodology (see Reflexivity). So while rhetoric has traditionally been thought of as being involved in such arenas as politics, law, public relations, lobbying, marketing and advertising, the study of rhetoric has recently entered into diverse fields such as humanities, religion, social sciences, law,[1] science, journalism, history, literature and even cartography and architecture. Every aspect of human life and thought that depends on the articulation and communication of meaning can be said to involve elements of the rhetorical. "In the last ten years, many scholars have investigated exactly how rhetoric works within a particular field".[2][3][4][5]

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